Mobius’ Story

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We were facing something unknown—and that made it all the more scary.

Seeing spots

2015-02-01_200829686_9389A_iOSIt was 14 days later. I first noticed Mobius kept rubbing his eyes before bed. He’d never been sick before.  You notice everything as a new parent, and this was certainly out of character. Then the next morning, he was quite warm. I took him out of his co-sleeper, undressed him to cool him down, and first noticed a couple of spots on his chest. When I took his temperature is was 101.8. My husband and I gave him a closer look over and I noticed a bigger cluster of spots on the back of his head. By now, he had more spots on his chest, too.  I called the pediatrician at this point, who suggested cooling measures and close monitoring of his fever. I gave him medicine to bring his fever down, but within a couple hours it went up to 102.  At this point, I was convinced I was crazy, but was suspecting measles. I got out some of my nursing textbooks to reference measles and other viral infections.  I didn’t want to believe my suspicion, but it showed measles starting with a high fever with a rash beginning from the hairline, or behind the ears and then traveling down the body.  That was exactly what was happening.

Because I had a difficult time controlling his fever at home and his spots were getting worse, I called the ER to tell them I suspected my baby had measles. I was scared, but calm enough to know I needed to get Mobius medical help and also make sure we didn’t infect anyone else. My husband was understandably concerned.  With something like measles, you don’t know what you’re dealing with. We didn’t know anyone whose child had been ill with measles. Even the staff at the hospital admitted they’d never seen a case before.  We were facing something unknown—and that made it all the more scary. 

 At the ER

The hospital arranged to have a negative pressure room (specialiMobiusMaskatHospitalzed for contagious patients) ready for us and staff rushed out to meet us in the parking lot with masks as they whisked us in the back entrance away from other patients. My reading had reminded me that measles is one of the most contagious diseases on the planet.  We weren’t going to take any chances infecting anyone else. Mobius wasn’t feeling great, but was happy to meet some new faces to smile at.

They gave our baby a nasal swab and blood test for measles. All of the staff who came in gowned up and had masks on for their protection. None of the medical staff had ever seen a case of measles before, so none of us really knew what to expect. The pediatrician who saw him made contact with the health department while we were there. It felt like we were all learning about his condition together and he was so little. We had done everything right and we were now scared for our baby son. We were there for a few hours until we controlled his fever, and were then allowed to go home. I called the health department on the drive home to make sure we were all on the same page.

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